Skip to content

Search results for 'sidney'

October 21, 2011

Saturday morning quote # 22: Sir Philip Sidney

Today’s quotes are from the writing of Sir Philip Sidney (1554 – 1586), the ideal (or idealized) Elizabethan courtier who left the world far too soon but left us with some eminently singable verse.  Sidney was preoccupied with the rhythmical meter of poetry and, although there are no surviving song settings in which the music […]

December 11, 2021

Saturday morning quotes 8.29: Mignarda reading list II

While trying to make sense of the ever-shifting state of the world this week, we take a few moments to share more quotations drawn from the Mignarda reading list. As usual, we present bits of flotsam from the constant research that informs our approach to historical music and poetry, concluding with a modicum of social […]

April 10, 2021

Saturday morning quotes 8.14: Unquiet Thoughts

We are pleased to announce the release of our long-awaited recording of English lute songs, available as of today, April 10, 2021. Unquiet Thoughts, Mignarda’s 14th album, is the capstone of decades of insight into the songs of John Dowland and his peers.  Having edited and published Dowland’s complete music for voice & lute in […]

June 1, 2019

Saturday morning quotes: Retro post

[We are re-visiting this pertinent post from February 2011 that was not originally part of our Saturday morning quotes series.] One of our earliest posts on this blog had to do with the modern listener’s receptiveness to old music in general and lute music in particular.  We mentioned the question of balancing voice and lute, […]

September 7, 2018

Saturday morning quotes 7.12: Lachrimæ III

“Hauing in forren parts met diuers Lute-lessons of my composition, publisht by strangers without my name or approbation; I thought it much more conuenient, that my labours should passe forth vnder mine owne allowance, receiuing from me their last foile and polishment; for which consideration I haue vndergone this long and troublesome work, wherein I […]

May 17, 2014

Saturday morning quotes 4.1: Substance

This post begins our fourth year of Saturday morning quotes, a weekly chore we perform both with a sense of responsibility and in a spirit of sharing.  We are constantly reminded that our perspective is quite unique in that we are committed to maintaining a simpler brand of existence in the face of an increasing dependence on […]

January 4, 2014

Saturday morning quotes 3.34: Quiet

An abundance of snow has a way of making the world a quieter place. We quote the third verse of one of our favorite texts by one of our favorite poets that was given a musical setting by one of our favorite composers. What prince so great as doth not seem to want; what man […]

December 8, 2012

Saturday quotes 2.29 Dowland’s training Part 7

 “A historian therefore, in all that he relates, should take care to be guided in his judgment by the genuine and real circumstances of every action…” – Polybius (c. 200 – 118 BC), The Histories Historical research should only present the unvarnished truth based on indisputable fact, despite the sometimes uncomfortable reality of deeds done […]

December 1, 2012

Saturday quotes 2.28 Dowland’s training Part 6

Our last post left off with Dowland’s documented performance before Queen Elizabeth, and his recorded display of cheek that we have come to associate with his character.  For today’s installment, we step back to the 1580’s and examine the activities of another well-known musician, Alfonso Ferrabosco, who may have even crossed paths with Dowland. Examining […]

February 20, 2011

Audiences and attention span

One of our earliest posts on this blog had to do with the modern listener’s receptiveness to old music in general and lute music in particular.  We mentioned the question of balancing voice and lute, and the relative quiet volume that results in reaching an optimum blend.  Of course, the combination of a solo voice […]