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Search results for 'dowland's training'

December 8, 2012

Saturday quotes 2.29 Dowland’s training Part 7

 “A historian therefore, in all that he relates, should take care to be guided in his judgment by the genuine and real circumstances of every action…” – Polybius (c. 200 – 118 BC), The Histories Historical research should only present the unvarnished truth based on indisputable fact, despite the sometimes uncomfortable reality of deeds done […]

December 1, 2012

Saturday quotes 2.28 Dowland’s training Part 6

Our last post left off with Dowland’s documented performance before Queen Elizabeth, and his recorded display of cheek that we have come to associate with his character.  For today’s installment, we step back to the 1580’s and examine the activities of another well-known musician, Alfonso Ferrabosco, who may have even crossed paths with Dowland. Examining […]

November 17, 2012

Saturday quotes 2.26 Dowland’s training Part 5

Today’s post continues our speculative probe into John Dowland’s background, examining the conditions and events that may have contributed to form the composer’s persona and, by extension, his unique and intricate musical style. Our last installment mentioned Dowland’s tenure as servant to Sir Henry Cobham, Ambassador to France.  We discussed the fine line between diplomatic […]

November 10, 2012

Saturday quotes 2.25 Dowland’s training part 4

“What time and diligence I haue bestowed in the search of Musicke, what trauel in forren countries, what successe and estimation euen among strangers I haue found, I leaue to the report of others” – John Dowland, The First Booke of Songes or Ayres (1597) Politics. Here in the US, we’ve had our fill of […]

October 27, 2012

Saturday quotes 2.23 Dowland’s training Part 3

The last two installments of our Saturday quotes have been given over to tracing the possible early musical training of John Dowland (1563 – 1626), probably the best-known representative of the Golden Age of English lute music.  We have cross-referenced some of the ample evidence indicating that, in Tudor England, the usual introduction to music […]

October 19, 2012

Saturday quotes 2.22 Dowland’s training Part 2

For whatever reason, music of the Elizabethan era seems to fall into the broad marketing category of “classical music”, a designation that belies the original popular or functional qualities of so much of the music.  It also misses by a mile the colorful personalities of the people who originally played what amounts to popular music — […]

October 14, 2012

Saturday quotes 2.21 Dowland’s training

“What time and diligence I haue bestowed in the search of Musicke, what trauel in forren countries, what successe and estimation euen among strangers I haue found, I leaue to the report of others” – John Dowland, The First Booke of Songes or Ayres (1597) While rather late to qualify for Saturday morning, today’s quotes […]

December 17, 2016

Saturday morning quotes 6.31: Performing Dowland

Although ’tis the season for that particularly tactless style of unapologetic American commercialism, we sidestep the sales talk, share a video of a recent performance, and reflect upon one of the primary reasons we began performing as a duo—the ayres for voice and lute by John Dowland (1563 – 1626).  Although we have released only […]

October 3, 2015

Saturday morning quotes 5.20: Dowland and Context

Our weekly posts are unapologetically focused on vocal music of the 16th century and the lute as it was regarded in its golden age; an emblem for all that was civilized and sophisticated, refined and nuanced.  Firmly committed to providing contextual references, we hope we might steer today’s lutenists away from their classical guitarist roots […]

June 19, 2015

Saturday morning quotes 5.5: Music matters #2

Musicians are—or can be—among our civilization’s more refined, creative and intelligent individuals.  We’re ruling out the attention-grabbing noisemakers and other anomalies like today’s ubiquitous Garage Band sample jockeys, Henry VIII, Ozzy Osborne (drug impaired, not really music), Richard Nixon (pianist, foul-mouthed pathological liar), Carlo Gesualdo (just plain psychotic), Ted Nugent (sorry Will, he’s a reactionary […]