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Don’t buy today – free holiday tracks from Mignarda

November 29, 2013

Buy nothing.

Don’t Buy.

This week, the American Thanksgiving holiday offers a respite from the rat race and a rare moment of reflection.  One wishes to be thankful for the many comforts and conveniences we enjoy in this modern age, and for the good fortune to enjoy the simple pleasures of a nourishing meal, a warm bed, and a lute song to improve one’s emotional outlook. Everything else, as they say, is gravy.

It hasn’t always been so easy for the multitudes that are now described as the “99-percent,” better known as those of us who endeavor to get by without bilking others out of their money, goods and chattel. But, for many, many good, honest people today, economic viability is no more than a fantasy with consumerist overtones.  What is known in the US as Black Friday is an utter abomination, and shows every sign of becoming worse by the year.  No longer content to entice consumers to spend the night after the holiday camping in the sleet in a parking lot for the holy grail of the Gizmo du Jour, the big box stores now require their underpaid employees to forgo the traditional family holiday altogether in order to get a jump-start on holiday consumerism.

Contrary to popular myth, our economic model is based not upon friendly competition that encourages innovation, but rather upon unfettered economic expansion free from governmental regulation and likewise free from moral constraints.  The goal of our economic model is monopoly, and it is typically achieved and maintained through unscrupulous means.

“[Marx] treated monopolies not as essential elements of capitalism but rather as remnants of the feudal mercantilist past which had to be abstracted from in order to attain the clearest possible view of the basic structure and tendencies of capitalism.”

Monopoly Capital: An Essay on the American Economic and Social Order, Paul A. Baran and Paul M. Sweezy, Monthly Review Press, New York, 1966, (p.4).

It is painfully clear to any thinking person who reads and heeds that our economic model is broken, and the very worst human element has risen to a position of great power.  The only means of resistance to that power is through nonparticipation.

Don’t buy things today.  Although we could certainly use the income, we walk our talk and do our bit to encourage economic awareness by offering the following tracks of holiday music at no cost.

UPDATED: 8 December 2013

What was to have been a day’s generosity was continued for 10 days, and we return to offering our tracks at the usual ridiculously low cost.  We thank the many readers who availed themselves to our free downloads of holiday music, and we encourage them to peruse our music further.

 

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2 Comments
  1. guitarlvr214 permalink

    Thank you for this timely reminder and the beautiful Advent pieces.

    On Friday, November 29, 2013, Unquiet Thoughts wrote: > Ron & Donna, Mignarda posted: ” Don’t Buy. This week, the American Thanksgiving holiday offers a respite from the rat race and a rare moment of reflection. One wishes to be thankful for the many comforts and conveniences we enjoy in this modern age, and for the good fortune to e” >

  2. Erika permalink

    What the retailers don’t want you to realise is that if they can make a profit from “Black Friday” sales then they could sell the goods at Black Friday prices every trading day and still make a profit. (That assumes, of course, that they don’t bring in particularly cheap and nasty rubbish to sell on “Black Friday” and that they aren’t indulging in bait advertising.)

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